1-888-254-2915

Home » AI » Automation is on the horizon for windows and glass industry

Automation is on the horizon for windows and glass industry

A new study shows that 79 percent of top business leaders in the U.S. say that they plan to incorporate robotics in their processes by 2020. About 82 percent of 300 senior executives plan to implement artificial intelligence (AI) by the same date.

The report, by Genpact, a Chicago-based consultancy that works in the digital transition field, reports that the top barriers to implementing AI are data security concerns, lack of clarity about how to use AI most effectively, and silos among departments that prevent collaboration. The company says that the only way AI will succeed in the future is through forcing a shift in corporate culture that emphasizes greater training and openness to what AI can offer.

“Collaboration between humans and machines has the power to improve customer experiences, grow revenue, and create new jobs, but only if senior management has the vision to proactively prepare and embrace change,” said N.V. ‘Tiger’ Tyagarajan, Genpact’s president and CEO.

A+W CEO Peter Dixen recently told Window and Door magazine that “Industry 4.0 will bring significant changes, not only in production, but in the complete value chain from quote-to-cash, as well as in the communication processes of a window manufacturer or reseller. The window factory of tomorrow will self-organize its ordering, production and delivery processes, and optimize continuously with each step. This includes production-related dynamic cost calculations, autonomous production planning, predictive maintenance and dynamic production. It will integrate internal communications as well as automating real-time information exchanges with partners, suppliers and customers.”

The US Glass News Network reports a wide emphasis on robotics at the recent GlassBuild America show in Atlanta in September. One company introduced Roboflow, an automated window handling system that integrates a four-point welder, as well as Roboclean, a cleaner operated via a robotic handling station. Both are from GED Solutions.

Another company, ABB Robotics, introduced YuMi, a machine that can easily solve a Rubik’s Cube. The company says the achievement shows robots can develop into co-workers alongside human employees safely.

Robots serving the windows and doors market have the potential to be used, not just in the manufacturing phase, but also in construction applications, such as the installation of fenestration products. Blueprint Robotics in Baltimore uses a robotic assembly line to assemble walls for modular homes. The robots cut openings for windows and doors and then sets them in place after the drywall, siding, and insulation is secured.

Do you use robotics in your company? Is this something you are pursuing in the future? Tell us your thoughts on AI in the comments below!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *